JETPOM- instructions to author

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND POLLUTION MITIGATION (JETPOM)

INSTRUCTIONS TO AUTHORS

 

ARTICLE TYPES
Three types of manuscripts may be submitted:

Regular Articles: These should describe new and carefully confirmed findings, and experimental procedures should be given in sufficient detail for others to verify the work. The length of a full paper should be the minimum required to describe and interpret the work clearly.

Short Communications: A Short Communication is suitable for recording the results of complete small investigations or giving details of new models or hypotheses, gene isolation and identification, innovative methods, techniques or apparatus. The style of main sections need not conform to that of full-length papers. Short communications are 2 to 4 printed pages (about 6 to 12 manuscript pages) in length.

Review Articles: Submissions of reviews and perspectives covering topics of current interest are welcome and encouraged. Review articles should be concise and no longer than 4-6 printed pages (about 12 to 18 manuscript pages). These are also peer-reviewed.

 

REVIEW PROCESS
All manuscripts are reviewed by an editor and members of the Editorial Board or qualified outside reviewers. The process will be a blind review. Decisions will be made as rapidly as possible, and the journal strives to return reviewers’ comments to authors promptly. The editorial board will re-review manuscripts that are accepted pending revision. It is the goal of JETPOM to publish manuscripts shortly after submission.

 

REGULAR ARTICLES
Use double spacing. All pages must be numbered, beginning with the abstract. All lines must be numbered, preferably continuously throughout the entire manuscript. To avoid unnecessary errors, you are strongly advised to use the 'spell-check' and 'grammar-check' functions of your word processor.
Divide your article into clearly defined and numbered sections. Subsections should be numbered 1.1 (then 1.1.1, 1.1.2,...), 1.2, etc.

The Title should be Concise and informative.
Author names and affiliations. Where the family name may be ambiguous (e.g., a double name), please indicate this clearly. Present the authors' affiliation addresses (where the actual work was done) below the names. Indicate all affiliations with a lower-case superscript letter immediately after the author's name and in front of the appropriate address. Provide the full postal address of each affiliation, including the country name and, if available, the e-mail address of each author.
Corresponding author. Clearly indicate who will handle correspondence at all stages of refereeing and publication, also post-publication. Ensure that phone numbers (with country and area code) are provided in addition to the e-mail address and the complete postal address. Contact details must be kept up to date by the corresponding author.
Present/permanent address. If an author has moved since the work described in the article was done, or was visiting at the time, a 'Present address' (or 'Permanent address') may be indicated as a footnote to that author's name. The address at which the author actually did the work must be retained as the main, affiliation address. Superscript Arabic numerals are used for such footnotes.

The Abstract A concise and factual abstract is required. The abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, the principal results and major conclusions. An abstract is often presented separately from the article, so it must be able to stand alone. For this reason, References should be avoided, but if essential, then cite the author(s) and year(s). Also, non-standard or uncommon abbreviations should be avoided, but if essential they must be defined at their first mention in the abstract itself.

Keywords
Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 6 keywords, using British spelling and avoiding general and plural terms and multiple concepts (avoid, for example, 'and', 'of'). Be sparing with abbreviations: only abbreviations firmly established in the field may be eligible. These keywords will be used for indexing purposes.

In general, non-standard abbreviations should be used only when the full term is very long and used often. Each abbreviation should be spelled out and introduced in parentheses the first time it is used in the text. Only recommended SI units should be used. Authors should use the solidus presentation (mg/ml). Standard abbreviations (such as ATP and DNA) need not be defined.

Introduction - State the objectives of the work and provide an adequate background, avoiding a detailed literature survey or a summary of the results. It should be understandable to colleagues from a broad range of scientific disciplines.
Materials and methods - should be complete enough to allow experiments to be reproduced. However, only truly new procedures should be described in detail; previously published procedures should be cited, and important modifications of published procedures should be mentioned briefly. Capitalize trade names and include the manufacturer's name and address. Subheadings should be used. Methods in general use need not be described in detail.

Results - should be presented with clarity and precision. The results should be written in the past tense when describing findings in the authors' experiments. Results should be explained, but largely without referring to the literature. Discussion, speculation and detailed interpretation of data should not be included in the Results but should be put into the Discussion section.

Discussion - should interpret the findings in view of the results obtained in this and in past studies on this topic.

Conclusions – the main conclusions of the study should be presented in a short Conclusions section, which should form a subsection of the Discussion section.

Acknowledgments – Brief and for institutions, people and grants only.

Tables should be kept to a minimum and be designed to be as simple as possible. Tables are to be typed double-spaced throughout, including headings and footnotes. Each table should be on a separate page, numbered consecutively in Arabic numerals and supplied with a heading and a legend. Tables should be self-explanatory without reference to the text. The details of the methods used in the experiments should preferably be described in the legend instead of in the text. The same data should not be presented in both table and graph form or repeated in the text.

Figure legends should be typed in numerical order on a separate sheet. Graphics should be prepared using applications capable of generating high resolution GIF, TIFF, JPEG or Powerpoint before pasting in the Microsoft Word manuscript file. Tables should be prepared in Microsoft Word. Use Arabic numerals to designate figures and upper case letters for their parts (Fig 1). Begin each legend with a title and include sufficient description so that the figure is understandable without reading the text of the manuscript. Information given in legends should not be repeated in the text.

References
Citation in text
Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa). Any references cited in the abstract must be given in full. Unpublished results and personal communications are not recommended in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text. If these references are included in the reference list they should follow the standard reference style of the journal and should include a substitution of the publication date with either 'Unpublished results' or 'Personal communication'. Citation of a reference as 'in press' implies that the item has been accepted for publication.

All citations in the text should refer to:
Single author: the author's name (without initials, unless there is ambiguity) and the year of publication;
Two authors: both authors' names and the year of publication;
Three or more authors: first author's name followed by 'et al.' and the year of publication. Citations may be made directly (or parenthetically).
Examples: Smith (2000), Blake et al. (2003), (Kelebeni, 1983), (Chandra and Singh,1992), (Chege, 1998; Steddy, 1987a,b; Gold, 1993,1995), (Kumasi et al., 2001)
'as demonstrated (Allan, 2000a, 2000b, 1999; Allan and Jones, 1999). Kramer et al.
(2010) have recently shown ....'

Reference style
References should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary. More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters 'a', 'b', 'c', etc., placed after the year of publication.

Examples:
Reference to a journal publication:
Otitoloju, A.A. (2003). Relevance of joint action toxicity evaluations in setting realistic environmental safe limits of heavy metals. Journal of Environmental Management, 67, 121-128.
Francis, J.E., Doherty, F.V., Sogbanmu, T.O. & Otitoloju, A.A. (2013). Histopathology alterations and lipid peroxidation as biomarkers of hydrocarbon-induced stress in the earthworm, Eudrilus eugeniae. Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, 185(3), 2189-2196.

Reference to a book:
Strunk Jr., W. and White, E.B. (2000). The Elements of Style, fourth ed. Longman, New York, 332pp.
Reference to a chapter in an edited book:
Mettam, G.R., Adams, L.B., 2009. How to prepare an electronic version of your article, in: Jones, B.S., Smith , R.Z. (Eds.), Introduction to the Electronic Age. E-Publishing Inc., New York, pp. 281-304.

Submission checklist
The following list will be useful during the final checking of an article prior to sending it to the journal for review. Please consult this Guide for Authors for further details of any item.
Ensure that the following items are present:
One author has been designated as the corresponding author with contact details:
• E-mail address
• Full postal address
• Telephone
• Manuscript has been 'spell-checked' and 'grammar-checked' and prepared according to author instructions
• All references mentioned in the Reference list are cited in the text, and vice versa
• Permission has been obtained for use of copyrighted material from other sources (including the Web)

AFTER ACCEPTANCE
We will do everything possible to get your article published quickly and accurately - please upload all of your corrections within 48 hours. It is important to ensure that all corrections are sent back to us in one communication. Please check carefully before replying, as inclusion of any subsequent corrections cannot be guaranteed. Proofreading is solely your responsibility. Note that JETPOM may proceed with the publication of your article if no response is received.

Offprints
The corresponding author, at no cost, will be provided with a PDF file of the article via email (the PDF file is a watermarked version of the published article and includes a cover sheet with the journal cover image and a disclaimer outlining the terms and conditions of use).

SHORT COMMUNICATIONS
Short Communications are limited to a maximum of two figures and one table. They should present a complete study that is more limited in scope than is found in full-length papers. The items of manuscript preparation listed above apply to Short Communications with the following differences:
(1) Abstracts are limited to 100 words;
(2) instead of a separate Materials and Methods section, experimental procedures may be incorporated into Figure Legends and Table footnotes;
(3) Results and Discussion should be combined into a single section.

Proofs and Reprints: Electronic proofs will be sent (e-mail attachment) to the corresponding author as a PDF file. Page proofs are considered to be the final version of the manuscript. With the exception of typographical or minor clerical errors, no changes will be made in the manuscript at the proof stage.

Copyright: Submission of a manuscript implies that the work described has not been published before (except in the form of an abstract or as part of a published lecture, or thesis), that it is not under consideration for publication elsewhere, that if and when the manuscript is accepted for publication, the authors agree to automatic transfer of the copyright to the publisher.

 


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